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Ecophiles, Daljit Ahluwalia

Exploring new cities is always an exciting adventure to take on when you travel, but when the cities are painted with eye-popping colors, it makes the atmosphere so much more of a treat (not to mention the photography is fantastic!). Here is a look at a few of the most colorful cities around the world!

Old San Juan, Puerto Rico

While Old San Juan may be one of the most popular Caribbean travel destinations, it is far from being your typical vacation hotspot. Puerto Rico’s historic area has streets filled with churches, houses, and forts coated in old-world Spanish and Caribbean tropical hues, bright pastel colored buildings, blue toned cobblestones, bright pink flowers, and a view of the bright blue ocean, which makes walking down the streets of the town an attraction of its own!

Photo: Ricardo’s Photography via Flickr

Photo: Bogdan Migulski via Flickr

Havana, Cuba

The brightly-colored colonial architecture (buildings with colors including florescent yellow, green and blue) helps bring out the vibrant and tropical feel of Havana. Make sure to stop by Avenida de Maceo, Paseo del Prado, Parque Central, and Plaza Mayor to check out some of the most colorful buildings. However, as you travel to Havana, you will see that the color is not only found in the buildings, but also through their classic cars, and festive outfits! A travel photography dream destination.

Photo: bez_uk via Flickr

Photo: 821292 via Pixabay

Photo: Falkenpost via Pixabay

Burano, Italy

All who travel to visit the Venetian town of Burano are intrigued by the picturesque visual of all of the colorful houses lined up down the channels of water, making each street look like a rainbow. An ancient legend says that the island’s fisherman painted their houses with bright colors so they could see them from long distance in the fog when they were far away for fishing. The town has carried on the Italian tradition by continuing to keep up the colorful paint. Interestingly, the houses follow a special color pattern based on a specific system: if you wish to paint your house, you must send a request to the government, and they will respond with a list of colors permitted for that specific lot of houses.

Noel_bauza via Pixabay

Bo Kaap, South Africa

Travel to Bo Kaap, an area of Cape Town, South Africa, specifically known for its brightly coloured homes and cobble stoned streets. The colorful houses are a recent innovation that celebrates the district’s Muslim identity. In earlier days, all the houses of Cape Town were mostly painted white, but residents began painting their houses in vivid colors in preparation for the celebration of Eid. Additionally, painting the homes in these bright, cheerful colors brings in a way to express happiness and joy and has now developed into a tradition throughout the neighborhood.

Bo Kaap, South Africa

Photo: South Africa tourism

Ilulissat, Greenland

Aside from their enormous, and spectacular ice sculptures, this town in western Greenland is known for the colorful buildings that stand out amongst its Arctic surroundings. In the 1700s, Greenland began the tradition of color-coding their buildings: hospitals were yellow, police stations black, fisheries blue, and people eventually chose more varied pigments for their homes. The color coding system of the past has definitely benefited us today by providing some major eye candy! How’s that for an off-beat travel destination?

Photo: Greenland Travel via Flickr

Cochem, Germany

The charming, scenic town of Cochem is a fairytale travel destination – composed of many medieval castles, colorful storefronts, river boats, etc., and the array of colors can be seen reflected in the Mosel river. Walking around the small, traditional town and taking in its atmosphere is the best way to enjoy it. Make sure you visit the town hall, the St. Martin church, and Balduinstor (a town gate), as well as the ruins of Winneburg castle.

Photo: Polybert49 via Flickr

Wroclaw, Poland

While most tourists who travel to Poland flock to the popular destinations of Krakow or Warsaw, visiting the smaller (more unknown) town of Wroclaw would be your best bet! Immediately you’ll notice that the picturesque old town has many buildings painted in rich colors that bring the city to life, and reflect the city’s youthful vibe. The colors range from subtle earth tones to pastels – nothing too over the top! No matter what your mood, or how dreary the weather may be when you travel, you’ll definitely leave happier and more cheerful after a visit. The medieval market square, a placed lined up with restaurants, flower boxes, and incredible architecture, also leaves you with your jaw dropping to the ground!

Photo: MrsBrown via Flickr

Photo: jan_nijman via Flickr

Newfoundland, Canada

Also referred to as “Jellybean Row,” travel to this area to see its brightly colored houses, laundry hanging on the line, and boats, all stand out against the grey skies, green forests, and dark stones in St. Johns, Newfoundland. However, you will immediately realize that these colorful buildings are not found in one street, but actually all over the area. Like most of these other fishing towns, the reason why these houses were painted in bright colors was because it helped sailors and fishermen find their way home through the fog and inclement weather. Makes for a gorgeous travel destination for your bucket list.

Photo via Pexels

Chefchaouen, Morocco

Famously referred to as “The Blue Pearl”, Chefchaouen is known for its striking blue architecture, attracting travel addicts from all around the world to walk around the town’s narrow streets and take pictures with the blue walls. Chefchaouen’s medina (old quarter) is very peaceful, and was initially painted by Jewish refugees from Europe who lived there during the 1930s to symbolize heaven. Also, in order to keep up with tradition, all of the houses in the area are washed with new coats of paint every year!

Photo via Pixabay

Jodhpur, India

When you travel to India, head to Jodhpur in Rajasthan. ‘The blue city’ of Jodhpur, this city gets its name from the bright indigo paint that many Brahmans use in order to cover their houses. However, the deeper you travel into the city, you’ll find that blue is not the only color you’ll see! For example, The Sardar Market in the city has an explosion of color of oranges, yellows, greens, and purples around every corner from the bangles, spices, footwear, to clothes!

Photo: Milo & Silvia in the world via Flickr

Photo: Matthew Laird Acred via Wikimedia Commons

Photo: Arian Zwegers via Flickr

Photo: Travelling Slacker via Flickr

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